Holiday Driving Demand Causing Temporary Gas Price Increase

Holiday driving causing temporary gas price increase

Heading into the final week of the year, the national average price for a gallon of gasoline is $2.44, an increase of two cents on the week. As more drivers hit the road for the holidays, the increase in driving demand is likely the cause for increases in some states. Despite the incremental jump, motorists in 33 states are paying less on the week – as much as nine cents. Today’s average is about 26 cents per gallon higher than a year ago. The cheapest gas can be found in Alabama ($2.17), while Hawaii ($3.29) sells the most expensive.

“The majority of motorists have seen savings at the pump this month. The national gas price average is over five cents cheaper than the beginning of December,” said Jeanette Casselano, AAA spokesperson.

Gas Price average chart

In the Mid-Atlantic, Gas prices range from a low of $2.23 in Tennessee to high of $2.69 in Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C. With a 12 cent price difference, Delaware saw the largest monthly decline in gas prices in the region.

According to the latest EIA report, gasoline inventories in the region increased by 1.2 million bbl on the week despite an increase in driving demand.